Things To Remember On The Day Of The Photo Shoot

 

Number 1 rule: Arrive on time for your photo shoot!

Make sure you understand the travel directions well in advance and leave the house with plenty of time to spare.

In this business… being on time means be 15 minutes EARLY – without exception!

 

Remember – you are working as a model. Do NOT bring a friend, relative or boyfriend to a photo shoot. You don’t take them to work with you. If you are not comfortable working with a photographer – you shouldn’t be going.

 

Drink lots of water. Bring snacks. Please avoid chocolate or anything that can stain your teeth. However feel free to bring chocolate for your photographer and makeup artist.

 

Wear loose fitting clothing so that there are NO lines on the skin. Do NOT wear socks.

Wear your hair natural and down, unless you have been given other directions by the photographer or your agency in advance.

Wear clear un-scented deodorant to protect your clothing and prevent flaking.

Do NOT wear jewelry

Bring your portfolio and/or any recent photographs that you have had taken. Never leave home without them!

Have Fun!   

 

Proper Clothing Selection For Your Modeling Portfolio Shoot

 

For a commercial model – the clothing is a costume. The clothing is meant to make the character convincing.

Let’s face it – if someone looks at your photos and comments on the outfit – you have failed. Your portfolio is designed to sell you – not the clothing, definitely not jewelry, and definitely not the makeup or photographers creativity.

 

When selecting outfits for a commercial portfolio shoot– be sure to follow these simple guidelines and you won’t go wrong.

Solid colors. Absolutely no floral prints or patterns.

Make sure the clothing fits properly. Be realistic. Just because you like to wear your clothing tight doesn’t mean that it looks good in a photograph that way.

No trendy or fashion oriented outfits. A commercial portfolio is about personality – your ability to look and act like an “attractive real person.”

Be sure to have a good mix of colors and styles. An agency should not be able to tell what your favorite color of clothing is when they look at your book.

No Jewelry!

 

For head shots, also be sure to remember the following guidelines

Avoid white and light pastel colors.

Warm earthy tones are best.

Avoid v-necks unless your photographer is proficient at photographing them properly.

If you are shooting more than one top – be sure to mix up the necklines.

Be sure that the top has shoulders – no spaghetti straps, tank tops or sleeveless shirts.

Shirts with texture are great for headshots. (Sweaters, knit or ribbed material, etc).

If you have planned your shoot properly – you started with ideas and then selected outfits to match the ideas.

Remember – your modeling portfolio is selling you and your ability to portray different characters. The outfits that you select are a costume and should not become the focus of the picture.

One final suggestion. . . If you find yourself with a great idea, but you don’t own the outfit that you need, avoid running out to the mall and spending money on an outfit that you may never wear again.

Beg, Borrow and Steal. Check with friends and relatives – you may be able to borrow the outfit that you need.

Use a credit card. Be sure to check on the stores return policy. Return the item after your shoot. (Don’t tell anyone that I gave you this idea.)

 

What To Bring To A Photo Shoot

Everything except the kitchen sink and even that can sometimes make a great prop! Your clothing If you are shooting with me, you will have already provided a detail list of styles and colors at least 1 week prior to the shoot. What you need to have in your modeling bag can vary from one […]

 

If you are shooting with me, you will have already provided a detail list of styles and colors at least 1 week prior to the shoot.

 

What you need to have in your modeling bag can vary from one shoot to the next. If you are working with a makeup artist or hair stylist, you generally won’t need to carry hair or makeup products, however it is a good plan to carry them just in case.

For a detailed list of what should be included in your makeup kit – Click Here.

 

 

The following is a detailed list of everything else that you might need to bring to a photo shoot.

 

Hair

Headband, rubber bands, bobby pins

Brushes, combs

Hair appliances (curling iron, rollers, straighteners)

 

Skin

Skin cleanser and moisturizer (Arrive bare-faced for shoots with makeup artists)

Makeup kit

Body makeup

Cotton balls and cotton swabs

Mirror

Body lotion for dry skin

Clear or nude nail polish, clippers, nail file, polish remover

 

Clothing

Shoes in neutral colors (dress and flats – black is a must)

Different colors of sandal foot nylons (Black, nude, tan and include toe-less if you can find a pair)

Black, white and flesh toned undies (one should be a thong)

Assortment of bras (black, white, nude, and strapless)

Plain black and white socks

 

Other

Safety pins, small sewing kit, clothes pins, clear nail polish (for runs)

Light dressing robe

Scarf or makeup mask to prevent makeup transfer

Dress shields or clear, non-scented deodorant

Emergency items (Tylenol, antacid, tampons, razor, bandages, etc)

Music, books or magazines for downtime

Bring your portfolio and/or any recent photographs that you have had taken.

 

What is an Acting Headshot?

A headshot is an actor’s most important marketing tool. It IS your first impression — it can lose you the job or get you the audition! Your acting headshot is your calling card — it represents you — so it better look like you…and when you walk through the door with your headshot, be sure […]

 

A headshot is an actor’s most important marketing tool.

 

It IS your first impression — it can lose you the job or get you the audition!

Your acting headshot is your calling card — it represents you — so it better look like you…and when you walk through the door with your headshot, be sure you look like your headshot! A great acting headshot will intrigue the viewer and make them want to meet you. It will hint at certain aspects of your personality and leave the viewer curious and wanting more.

Color acting headshots are now standard. Traditionally this 8″x10″ print of a ‘head and shoulders’ photograph is used to submit to casting agencies or take along to auditions. The shot needs to include your name somewhere on the print.

Printed versions of your headshot are still crucial, but it is increasingly common for submissions to be done online.

Most casting agencies or agents won’t sign you unless you have an acting headshot, and most will want you to update your headshots with new ones every 6 months to a year or as your look changes.

Some actors may find it necessary to have at least two distinct photos either showing contrasting emotions or looks. For example, an opera singer needs a more glamorous headshot than a commercial actor or musical theater singer needs. If you are an opera singer but interested in doing acting work other than opera, you may find it necessary to have a second shot geared more towards commercial or other theater work. It’s important to have a photo that is the right “look” for your particular industry.

You still only have one chance – one photo to make a good first impression, show what you look like as well as your body type and to convince a casting agency or director that you have loads of personality.

Sound tough? It can be, but with a little thought and preparation you can get the shot.

They say that “A picture is worth a thousand words”… so make sure yours says at least that many!

 

10 Tips for a Great Acting Headshot

Your acting headshot is your most important marketing tool for acting work.

You only get one chance to make a good first impression.

Here are some suggestions to make sure that your acting headshot is a hit with casting directors.

 

10 Tips for a Great Acting Headshot

  1. Lots of Personality!! Many people may have a similar look to you- it’s your personality that makes you special.
  2. . Look like your acting headshot. This is not a time to be a beauty queen. You need to give casting directors and clients an accurate version of yourself.
  3. Keep your clothing choices simple. Avoid patterns and prints in favor of solid colors. No white or very light pastels. Simple clothing helps the viewer see YOU.
  4. Spark the viewer’s imagination. Don’t dress like a nurse or a police officer. You want the viewer to be able to imagine you as many different characters from one picture.
  5. Go easy on the makeup! Yes, you want to look your best for your acting headshot, but that does NOT mean layers of eyeshadow and blush. If you can, hire a makeup artist. Keep in mind, you should pay close attention to what your makeup artist does so when you go to an audition or to meet an agent you can walk in the door looking as close to your picture as possible.
  6. Don’t show a lot of skin! Ladies, this means no excess cleavage. Guys, keep your shirts on. Casting directors want to see you…but not that much of you!
  7. Keep in mind what kind of work you are trying to get. Do you want to do theater, film, or commercial work?
  8. It’s all about the eyes. Of course your smile is important, too, but the eyes can make or break your picture. Your eyes give you the opportunity to show the layers in your personality. Rather than thinking about the viewer looking at your picture, think about you looking at the viewer.
  9. Face shot or ¾ shots. ¾ shots are useful to show a casting director your body type. This can be good if you are looking to do commercial work modeling clothes. Be careful, though. In a ¾ shot, your eyes can get lost. A face shot is the best way to show your eyes and your personality…

Which brings me to my last tip:

  1. Did I mention PERSONALITY? Be yourself and show what makes you unique.